What You Need To Know About Angus Beef


Black Angus beef-486815_640

You all have seen it when shopping in the meat section of the grocery store. Angus Beef. Hailed as the premier beef of beefs. Always pristinely packaged with its own distinct labels claiming its superiority over your run of the mill regular beef. Always demanding a higher price per pound as well.

We’ve also been bombarded with  in fast food restaurants and bragging backyard grill men.

Well don’t just take their word for it I say, let’s educate ourselves on this premier beef and be in the know

How about let’s get the lowdown on Angus beef?

It comes from a  Scottish breed of cattle. Formerly called Aberdeen Angus after their place of origin, Angus cattle are among the most commonly used breeds in American beef production. Popular among consumers because they have more meat on their bones than other breeds and because their meat has distinctive “marbling”—flecks of fat, which contribute to flavor and texture. Although the breed has a relatively upscale reputation, there’s nothing necessarily superior about Angus beef.  It’s available in  various grades of quality, as determined by the United States Department of Agriculture: prime, choice, select, commercial, utility, and cutter.

Now here is where you  need to pay attention folks. Angus the breed is not synonymous with the brand  Certified Angus Beef.  Certified Angus Beef is an upmarket product created in  1978 by the American Angus Association.  Here is the low down on the real deal.

The Certified Angus Beef ® brand is reserved for Angus beef that, after meeting the live specification of being at least 51% black-hided or AngusSource® enrolled, is verified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) as meeting the ten CAB carcass specifications:

  1. Modest or higher marbling
  2. Medium or fine marbling texture – tiny flakes of fat that enhance the moisture and flavor of the beef
  3. “A” maturity for each, lean and skeletal characteristics
  4. 10 to 16 square inch ribeye area
  5. Less than 1,000 pound hot carcass weight
  6. Less than 1 inch fat thickness
  7. Superior muscling (restricts dairy influence)
  8. Practically free of capillary rupture
  9. No dark cutters
  10. No neck hump exceeding 2 inches
Too agriculturally detailed for you? Yeah me too.  Just remember, if you are going after the  upscale real Angus beef….look for the label Certified Angus Beef ®. Certified being the key word.
Look for the USDA grade (Premium, Choice, Select, etc.). A CAB-certified Prime cut of Angus beef will set you back a small fortune but some swear the orgasm your palate will have is worth it.
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Author: Geo Gee

I'm a curious one that finds politics, social issues, and diverse progressive solutions interesting. I believe information and education are the most powerful weapons one can arm himself with. Those two dynamics alone open the doors to opportunities. I also subscribe to each one teach one for a better world for all.

1 thought on “What You Need To Know About Angus Beef”

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