Johns Hopkins Researchers Warn That Tight Weaves & Braids Lead To Balding

Stop The Tight Weave The Hair You Save May Be Your Own

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Johns Hopkins researchers are urging black women to avoid weaves, braids and hair extensions because of the risks of permanent hair loss.

Researchers and some hair stylists say that these hairstyles, which can pull on the scalp, can contribute to traction alopecia, a form of gradual hair loss, which about one-third of African-American women suffer from. Continue reading “Johns Hopkins Researchers Warn That Tight Weaves & Braids Lead To Balding”

Black Women Workout with Straight Hair – Monae Artistry’s Hair and Makeup Blog

A lot of Black women have committed to a healthier lifestyle that includes some form of an exercise regime but have concerns about the effects exercise will have on their hair style.

I have been a fan of Monae Everet @ Monae Artistry  for years. She’s worked on the loftiest  echelons of the runway, big screen, and sports. She’s also created some of the most beautiful brides to ever walk down an aisle.

While some pro stylists are mum with the techniques they use to enable top models and celebrities to be presented at their best, Monae has always been generous with hair and makeup tutorials that work.

The link below will take you to her recommendations to Black Women that have concerns about the mix of exercise and hair.

Thank her by leaving a comment on her blog. And oh tell her Geo sent you.

 

Go Here -> Black Women Workout with Straight Hair – Monae Artistry’s Hair and Makeup Blog

How to Maintain Your Hair During Exercise for African American Women -by Monae Everett

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All of the women studied agreed that it is important to lead a healthy life, which includes exercise.

Exercise is especially important in the African-American community because we are more prone to diabetes, hypertension, and complications due to obesity, including heart disease. Though we face many health concerns that exercise will combat, African American women have a legitimate concern about their hair while  working out.

African American women are known to spend more money on their hair than women of any other ethnicity. This explains their apprehension to exercise and undoing their costly hair style. It is not uncommon for an African American woman to go to the salon and spend $100 on her hair service. After spending money on their hair service, many women feel that it would be a waste their money to “sweat out” their hair style at the gym. Any woman who has naturally curly or coarse hair understands the difficulty of keeping their hair

After spending money on their hair service, many women feel that it would be a waste their money to “sweat out” their hair style at the gym. Any woman who has naturally curly or coarse hair understands the difficulty of keeping their hair straightened while working up a sweat.

Perspiration causes the hair to become wet and revert back to its naturally curly and/or coarse state. Sweat, which is comprised of water and salts (sodium and potassium), can make the hair appear dry and dull. In order for a woman  to wear her hair in her preferred straightened hair style after vigorously working out, she would have to repeat the straightening process. That process generally includes shampooing, conditioning, roller setting or blow drying, and flat ironing the hair. This process can take hours. Contrary to popular belief, curly and coarse hair is fragile. The hair cannot be shampooed and thermally styled numerous times per week. Over shampooing, the hair will cause it to become dry and break.

There is something women faced with this dilemma can do.

Continue reading “How to Maintain Your Hair During Exercise for African American Women -by Monae Everett”